reflection

Reflection: The dissertation option

I have recently completed my final assignment for CS, and although I will only receive the results of assessment in March 2020, my tutor Russell has given me very positive feedback in the conclusion of our discussions and tutor report. The final tutor report from Robert, my tutor for BoW, has also commended the improvement in my writing skills. This combined with further complimentary peer feedback has left me emboldened to keep a divergent thought process towards A2 and consider writing a paper as an option for my publication in SYP.

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Reflection: Peer feedback on Contextual Studies

After completing my final assignment for Contextual Studies, my tutor Russell suggested that since the final draft is resolved and agreed with us both, it would be good to ask for peer feedback to some focused questions. The reasoning being that both Russell and I have a vested interest in the area of enquiry; East Asian art, and so our ongoing discussions have developed a fluid dialogue that didn’t require much background info. But other readers may not know the photographers I have written about and there is also a chance that the assessors also are not so familiar with Bae Bien-U, Lee Jungjin etc.

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Assignment five: Tutor report

Following the prompt return of my tutor report for A5 and the conclusion of BoW I feel a slight sadness that things have come to a close. Although of course there is much to look forward to and keep me busy, letting go and knowing when to finish is part of project culture, something I am familiar with in my nomadic professional life. Still it is nice to look back on a project and process with some fondness. As Robert says “art is a process” that is “never complete”. Very true, creative practice is cyclical and offers a continual return to a world that is strange and familiar.

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Assignment five: Reflection

The finalising of my portfolio for BoW in A5 ended up being a pretty simple task. Because of my intention to dovetail SYP, I was able to use A1 in the final module to help me decide what kind of direction I wanted the work to pursue. In creating the proposal document with the intention of professional feedback, I believed that presenting the concept worked best over process. I still have the process photographs if needed in a certain kind of publication, but as a portfolio I believe a method of ‘show not tell’ works best, leaving the viewer with space to ask questions rather than offer answers. Having this crossover between the two modules also helped me resolve an introduction text, artist statement and biography that is concise for a public audience.

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Assignment one: Tutor report

I had my first tutorial and report from Gina, my tutor for SYP. It was a very positive discussion on the presentation and variety of feedback I requested from my network in producing A1. Overall this was a very satisfying conclusion to the first part of SYP and a sense of closure as I have spent much of the summer months consolidating work. Operating a a much slower pace than previously is still a learning curve for me and part of my need to manage my own expectations.

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Assignment one: Reflection

My initial engagement with SYP has been a non-linear process. Due to personal circumstances, which included moving to another country, I stockpiled work for A1 while I was in Liverpool, knowing there would be a lack of opportunity once I moved to KL to engage directly with people. Although I still have access to a network of peers and professionals to connect with back in the UK, I specifically wanted to meet someone new (Sarah Fisher) so I could propose my work without any previous knowledge of my practice. I also wanted to engage in direct talks rather than via email so I found my approach to be proactive, even if I wasn’t fully prepared in my presentation.

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Assignment four: Tutor report

Having received my tutor report for A4 from Robert, I must admit I felt reassured that the conceptual was well received going forward. The time gap between A3 and interventions for me made the assignment take on an added pressure to deliver after the big build up. This was compounded by the limited time I could undertake the work so overall I feel happy about the feedback and glad I continued to take risks. And now going on with A5, to continue producing a few more formations and interventions so I can select from a wider group of case studies is a clear enough brief.

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Assignment four: Reflection

After concluding my theorisation in A3, I set about using A4 to bring this concept into the public space. This is not only an evolution of formations as a strategy, but also a return to A1, where I presented my notational impulses of photographing shadow patterns which I regard as a form of ephemeral street art. Even now I continue to make notations whenever inspired. Together with my approach to framing shadow patterns within a standardised form of A4 paper before returning a 1:1 scale rendering to its place of creation; a way of seeing has evolved both for interior and exterior spaces which is interconnected in its various forms.

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Reflection: Drafting interventions

Back in May I had the opportunity to finish my time up in Liverpool by putting into practice the theory for my BoW in the public space, before heading to my new pastures of Kuala Lumpur. While this wasn’t completely a now or never situation, my coming 6-12 months will be limited to the domestic space where I could, in theory continue with my formations strategy which is based upon working within the confines of home much like Uta Barth. In addition my accessibility to photo quality printing is not the same as what I had previously in my studio space, making the logistics of the process more inhibiting.

There was a sense of unknown how the ideas would translate outside, however I had undertaken plenty of research beforehand on site-specificity and participation. After a period of getting the technique and process right, I gathered 6 completed interventions on the public space around Liverpool.

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Reflection: Case studies and learnings

As I mentioned in my previous post, I have started working with my ideas of shadowgrams and formations in the public space.

I quickly realised that working with a camera setup was too slow and intrusive. Much like my notations and many of my earlier OCA projects, I drew on the incognito characteristic of the smartphone which allows me greater mobility and dexterity in operating within the public realm. My ‘gear’ was now reduced to a simple A4 wallet which I carried chalk (for dark surfaces and paint stick (for light surfaces) and an A4 card to mark the space. I could then use the wallet for transporting the prints for installation. In a way, the wallet has become part of the “…presence of the artist…” which then “…endows places with a ‘unique’ distinction.” (Kwon, 1997, p.105).

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Reflection: Entering the public space

This case study is grounded in the theory I presented in A3 in a domestic space. While I considered those earlier formations to be a form of visual meditation, the interventions in the public space take on a dynamic course of action akin to street art. The process requires a “fluid mobility” that embraces “…site specificity as a nomadic practice.” (Kwon, 1997, p.100).

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Reflection: A matter of scale

Prior to entering the public space to commence with experimenting for A4, I have had (too much) time to consider how my A4 paper placeholders will be affectively used. Scale becomes a matter of concern in making a coherent formation. Shadows outside are significantly larger outdoors compared to the contained graphic compositions in the image space when working indoors. So if I was to try to create a mosaic of time and light on an exterior surface, I will need to consider the size of the object that the shadow is being cast from.

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Assignment three: Tutor report

As I mentioned in my reflection, I am very satisfied with how the critical thinking has developed in A3. Especially after some of the convoluting of theory in A2. So not only am I pleased to see this rewarded in my tutor report, but also the encouragement to continue to read and take risks in my work. Overall the report was very positive and through my tutorial and follow-up emails with Robert, I was able to find a good balance of theory without creating a referential overload. My thinking has been quite deep for what looks a simple abstraction process, but I think the continued sharing with my tutor and study group peers has helped me to distill this into something much more concise.

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Assignment three: Reflection

The process of A3 has been an interesting development in my BoW. From my initial progression past A2 I was confronted with the great doubt, initially feeling the need to defend my work, or more specifically, the purpose of it. I acknowledged that the personal meditation was not substantial enough as a point of entry and the use of video didn’t quite work. However I remained steadfast in the basic idea, I just needed to more succinctly express what I am doing and why. And so a period of reading and research helped me to articulate the areas of documentation, process, representation and site-specificity.

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Reflection: The Shadowgram antithesis

After catching up on my last experiments with the shadowgram last week. I finally reached a state of being up to date in both BoW and CS for all the work I had carried out. So without having any outstanding works for once I posed myself a quick assessment and mini challenge.

The central idea of the shadowgram strategy is to return the abstract image back to its place of capture; therefore leaving an intervention on the ‘physical space’, while the standardised A4 paper print occupies the ‘image space’. David Campany writes about these spatial considerations saying when we see “What Sander called the “mosaic” of the photographic assembly is an expression of the mosaic nature of bodily and spatial experience.” (Campany, 2018).

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Reflection: Artwork in the public space?

Watching a rerun of a documentary recently on Antony Gormley, What do artists do all day?, I was struck by a couple of initial statements he makes. Gormley, who has an installation Another Place in nearby Crosby says “Sculpture puts something into the world that wasn’t there before.” (What do artists do all day?, Episode 12, 2014). And through this intervention “To that bit of the world, the setting of the world is changed.” I considered in broader terms, isn’t this the case when any artwork enters the world? In the public space, in order to install a piece of art in public, the ownership of the work is relinquished to the space itself. And therefore any further interventions would also be a casualty of the previous expression. It is in this spirit that I enjoy the work of Gormley, together with James Turrell and Richard Serra, that thy evolve sculpture into a kind of experiential placeholder.

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Assignment two: Tutor report

I received the feedback for A2 Shadowgram from my tutor. Here I will break down how I would like to reflect on the input.

Firstly the thing I disagree with is that I haven't explained my ideas in my notes. At the very least I would say that I have been clear in how I came to the creative strategy and developed it. I wrote posts that established the idea, consolidated it through printing, replaced printing with post-production and lastly played with exposure time. I also wrote about how the work of Uta Barth challenged me on how to differentiate my approach photographing light on the interior space.

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